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Author Topic: Correct Bolt Operation for Ross Cadet .22 LR  (Read 1526 times)
Loyer
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« on: August 22, 2014, 09:18:09 AM »

Just how does a properly set up Ross Cadet operate as far as cycling a cartridge ?

When a .22 cartridge has been fired I believe the mechanism on the trigger guard first needs to be pressed. 

Question 1: Should the bolt then spring out on it's own and eject the casing or is manual bolt withdraw correct ?

Question 2: If bolt springs back is it the spring force of the firing pin against the bolt spring that does the pushing? 

Currently on my Ross Cadet I need to press the release on the trigger guard and pull the bolt back manually after each shot.
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Barryj
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2014, 11:14:52 AM »

1. open bolt and place .22 in chamber.
2. push bolt closed. Ready to fire.
3. you decided not to fire, but want live round out of chamber.
4. push release in the front of the trigger-guard.
5. bolt pops open; extract loaded round.
6. to repeat cycle, return to step 1.

7. If after performing Step 2, you decide to fire, once "bang" is heard, bolt opens manually.
8. Thank Sir Charles quietly for another fine product-
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Loyer
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2014, 03:31:43 PM »

That is exactly what I needed to know.  Thank you.

My wooden stock (military version)  has a shiny shellac-like coating.  Was oil on walnut the orignal finish or was a shellac of sorts used ?
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Barryj
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2014, 04:27:54 PM »

I recognize three distinct variations of the full-length stocked 1912 Cadet.
1. Military- straight grain walnut, oiled finish. MilMarkings on right side of the stock.
2. Commercial- better grade of walnut, with semi-gloss finish same-same as Commercial .303 Target rifle.Commercial serial on the left side of the barrel.
3. Clean-up Run Guns- Assembled from leftovers in the Plant after the Factory was essentially stolen from Sir Charles by the Canadian Gov't.
   No MilProofs, no Commercial serials. No big deal.
If yours is in fact a full-whack Military, would you please post a photo of the markings on the right side of the stock? Many are interested.
The shellac does not belong, and like many I've owned, should respond well to paint remover and then several applications of BLS cut 50:50 with Varsol.
Need I add "no sandpaper"?
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Loyer
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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2014, 04:44:39 PM »

I  use a nice sharp hatchet and a wood rasp to remove old shellac from my guns.  It is really fast and leaves a nice "distressed" look to the wood.

Here is a photo of the butt stock before I hack away....

http://i1189.photobucket.com/albums/z426/Loyer333/DSCF3089_zpsfadf31d0.jpg

http://i1189.photobucket.com/albums/z426/Loyer333/DSCF3088_zpscfcc9d7a.jpg
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Loyer
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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2014, 05:16:13 PM »

Wow....I just threw up in my throat a little bit as I was re-reading the above.
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