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Author Topic: The very earliest Ross Sporters....  (Read 2445 times)
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« on: February 05, 2011, 07:30:42 PM »

... don't seem to exist in collections  Sad  just a microscopic few specimens of the the M1897 and M1900 with the Mannlicher style magazine in museums.  Not much for collectors to work with.  We do know that Sir Charles derived inspiration from the Austrian M1895 Steyr straight pull rifle.  These rifles are available (in military style) but bear only minimal resemblance to the earliest Ross sporting rifles.  A recent rifle however has proved quite the opposite and let me start with letting some pictures began the story:





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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2011, 07:34:36 PM »

More pictures -






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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2011, 07:41:15 PM »

Taking a break from posting pictures, here is some historical information:

Johann Peterlongo, Innsbruck, Tiroler Waffenfabrik Custom Steyr Mannlicher M95 Rifle 8x50R Austrian cal.

This custom Steyr Mannlicher rifle is inscribed TIROLER WAFFENFABRIK, J. PETERLONGO, INNSBRUCK on the engraved barrel rib. Johann Peterlongo was an Innsbruck Austria gun maker 1826 to 1898. Richard Mahrholdt & Son, also known as the Tiroler Waffen fabrik Peterlongo, Innsbruck, Austria was founded as Tiroler Waffenfabrik in 1854, and became Mahrholdt & Sohn in 1939. Richard Mahrholdt lived from 1878 to 1949. From 1898 to 1918 he was head of Tiroler Waffenfabrik Peterlongo Richard Mahrholdt & Sohn (Tyrol gun factory P. R. M. & son) in Innsbruck/Austria. That factory was founded by Johann Peterlongo in Innsbruck in 1854. The production of Tiroler Waffenfabrik Peterlongo R. M. & Sohn included • target rifles • rifles for high power cartridges and repeating rifles • drillings • side-by-side rifles • over-and-under rifles with different calibres • over-and-under shotguns • over-and-under rifle-shotguns • scope mounting
R. Mahrholdt was in good contact with the Suhl gunsmith August Schüler. In his time he was known as a good expert of gunnery. He is the author of the "Waffenlexikon", which was published in 1931 and its second edition in 1937. This book is even today in publication and revision.
Mahrholdt was one of the biggest gun gurus of pre-war Germany. He was also a master gunmaker with a safety drilling of his own design. His greatest legacy was the "Waffen-Lexicon", first published in 1931 followed by editions in 1937. It is still in print, but has been heavily edited so that the good info on older makers has been lost. If you can find the 2nd edition, get it. It is a treasure trove of gun lore, patents and company profiles now lost to posterity.
Mahrholdt managed the Peterlongo guns works in Innsbrück, Austria from 1898-1918 after which he took over as his own under the name of Tiroler Waffenfabrik Peterlongo, Richard Mahrholdt und Sohn. After Mahrholdt's death in 1947, it was taken over by his son, Herbert, who was also co-author of later editions of Waffen-Lexikon. The Tiroler Waffenfabrik (Tyrolean Arms Factory) closed shop some time in the 1970’s. Credit to CLUB LITTLEGUN (http://www.littlegun.be/ ).


 
 
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2011, 07:57:31 PM »

Back to pictures -


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Grogel
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« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2011, 09:26:48 PM »

I saw these and thought of your rifle Steve But from what Ive read the chance of finding a set that would work is slim, It still might be worth getting some measurements from the sellers.

http://cgi.ebay.com/German-scope-Voigtlander-SKOPAR-E-rare-/110645986019?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19c303c2e3

http://cgi.ebay.com/Original-WW1-WW2-german-rifle-scope-ZF39-Zeiss-Zielvier-/180614950191?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a0d7d6d2f
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2011, 03:25:11 PM »

Thanks Gary!  If anyone else runs across some vintage mounts or mount/scope combination, let me know.
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« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2011, 12:11:56 PM »

An interesting and very attractive rifle.  Have you been able to date it, even approximately?  That would determine what type of scope would be suitable or likely to have been fitted originally.

The forend type is reminiscent of a string instrument somehow.

How common were barrel ribs on continental sporting arms?  My impression is they were not.

The different stippling on the rear bridge and the receiver ring is a bit unusual too.

What is your impression of the ease of operation of the bolt vs. a Ross M10 for example?
« Last Edit: February 14, 2011, 12:18:58 PM by 280_Ross » Logged

"In my opinion there is no such thing as a 'foolproof' firearm and therefore fools should leave them alone." C.C. Meredith referring to the Ross rifle.
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« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2011, 07:23:58 PM »

Yes, I can see the forend is reminiscent of a musical instrument.  I would say a string instrument of some kind.  The ease of operation appears about the same as a Ross. Of course, among Ross I have noted a fair amount of variable.  Some work quite smoothly with a minimum of effort and others at the end of the spectrum.  My impression is that ribbed barrels are not uncommon on continental rifles.  I have an Eduard Kettner here in .30/06 that has a solid barrel.  I don't think the ribs did a lot for accuracy but they sure look neat  Cool  As far as vintage I am thinking in the teens but could even be earlier.
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